Otto Freundlich “Cosmic Communism” @ Museum Ludwig, Cologne

Museum Ludwig, ML, Ausstellungsansichten Ot­to Fre­undlich - Kos­misch­er Kom­mu­nis­mus, Ausstellungszeitraum18. Fe­bruar – 14. Mai 2017, Köln

Museum Ludwig, ML, Ausstellungsansichten Ot­to Fre­undlich – Kos­misch­er Kom­mu­nis­mus, Ausstellungszeitraum18. Fe­bruar – 14. Mai 2017, Köln

I am currently working on my book on ‘Cosmic Materialism’, supported by Warwick Social Theory Centre. The book looks at the role of science and the parallel re-evaluation of alternative cosmologies/ontologies in the anti-colonial and anti-totalitarian movements of the interwar period. The artist statement in this exhibition (h/t Gesa Helms) is very exemplary of how the cosmic was envisioned as a provocation to contemporary politics:

“For him [Otto Freundlich], abstraction expressed a radical renewal that went far beyond art. For instance, the curved patches of color in his paintings reflect the concept of space in Einsteinian physics, with which he was familiar from an early age. Still, overcoming representationalism also had a social dimension for him. As he saw it, every form of material perception was permeated with possessiveness and thus outdated: “The object as the antithesis to the individual will disappear, and with it the state of one person being an object for another.” He always viewed the harmony of the colors in his paintings in the context of the greater whole. The notion of communism for which he fought sought to abolish all boundaries “between world and cosmos, between one person and another, between mine and yours, between all the things that we see”.”

Needless to say, this book (and this exhibition) isn’t sadly just about the past.

Otto Freundlich
Cosmic Communism
February 18–May 14, 2017
Opening: February 17, 7pmMuseum Ludwig, Cologne
Heinrich-Böll-Platz
50667 Cologne
Germanywww.museum-ludwig.de
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Caribbean Queer Visualities & Transmission Gallery, Glasgow

Another interesting event, this time in Glasgow (thanks for this one, Gesa!). Official information here, Facebook here.

Location : Transmission
Date : Saturday, 18 February – Saturday, 25 March
Time : 11am-5pm/Tues-Sat

Transmission is pleased to be hosting the Small Axe-curated exhibition, Caribbean Queer Visualities in partnership with the British Council.

“One of the most remarkable developments in the Caribbean and its diaspora over the past two decades or so is the emergence of a generation of young visual artists working in various media (paint, film, performance) who have been transforming Caribbean visual practice, perhaps even Caribbean visual culture.

Importantly these younger artists did not grow up in the “aftermaths of sovereignty” so much as in the aftermaths of sovereignty’s aftermaths. They grow up in a context in which the great narratives of sovereignty, once oppositional, once open to the adventure of a future-to-come, have congealed and ossified, and in doing so disclose more and more their own modes of exclusion, marginalization, repression, and intolerance. And as the old anti-systemic movements for social and political change became installed in power in the new states of the region they stultified into new modes of orthodoxy, into their own terrified normativities, anxiously policing the boundaries of identity and community, the expressions of personhood and belonging, of sex and pleasure.

These are precisely themes that preoccupy this younger generation, and that provoke and illuminate the domain we call Caribbean queer visuality.”

David Scott

Director, The Small Axe Project

ARTISTS

Ewan Atkinson (Barbados)

Jean-Ulrick Désert (Haiti/Germany)

Richard Fung (Trinidad/Canada)

Andil Gosine (Trinidad/Canada)

Nadia Huggins (St.Vincent & the Grenadines)

Leasho Johnson (Jamaica)

Charl Landvreugd (Suriname/Netherlands)

Kareem Mortimer (Bahamas)

Ebony G. Patterson (Jamaica)

Jorge Pineda (Dominican Republic)

Curated and coordinated by:

David Scott, Columbia University

Erica James, Yale University
Nijah Cunningham, Princeton University

Caribbean Queer Visualities was first shown at the Outburst Queer Arts Festival in Belfast.

CFPs: I/Mages of Tomorrow & Techno Resistance and Black Futures

Just received these calls (thanks, Anja and Holly), which may be of interest to readers. More info on I/Mages of Tomorrow here and on Techno Resistance and Black Futures here.

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“I/Mages of tomorrow invites activists, artists, academics, film-makers, community organisers, scientists and tech-creators to consider what can be achieved when we come together as people of colour, as black and brown bodies, as queer, trans and non-binary voices and do not only talk about whiteness, patriarchy, islamaphobia, racism, or homophobia. Blackness will be explored not only in the diasporic context in which it operates almost always in the position of minority, but from the perspective of majority narratives from geopolitical and geographical locations in which whiteness is not the normalised, de-politicised default.

We welcome submissions addressing critical whiteness by white and white-migrant bodies speaking out on privilege, solidarity, silence, giving space and calling out. This anti-conference conference will be an immersion in the impossible materialised, a beautiful and empowering attempt at community, healing, creation, a challenging and unsettling exploration of our capacity to invoke dreams and to enact them into reality.

I/Mages of tomorrow prioritises black and brown, queer and trans, people of colour voices and we especially encourage those submissions. “

Techno Resistance and black futures conference

#blacktechfutures

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“We’re delighted to announce Techno Resistance and Black Futures conference taking place at Goldsmiths, University of London on 27th May, 2017.

In his 1994 essay ‘Black to the Future: Interviews with Samuel Delaney, Greg Tate and Tricia Rose,’ Mark Dery describes the black body as inhabiting a perverse space of cultural intolerance. In a very real sense, Dery describes the black body as occupying a place in history where the Diaspora is more reminiscent of the strangeness of alien abduction, rather than that of a self-determinant peoples.

Still, according to Dery, subjugation of the black body is situated in the techno-scientific, where the subject is articulated as real only in as much as it is made visible in contact with the most (dis)functional modes of technological progress: today in terms of the tip of a police bullet, the subject of the body cam or racial profiling, the efficiency of redlined pricing and other technologies that disproportionately reduce the free mobility of black people. For technology has been, and remains today, an insufficient means of liberation for the black body.

Paradoxically, since the projects of the Enlightenment and the technological dystopia called modernity, the technical has also functioned as the black body’s precise mode of individual and collective departure. Technological speculation, as a technique of relation borrowing from Brian Massumi (2008) or what Alanna Thain (2008) describes as ‘a lived reality of relation too often obscured by a retroactive distancing between mind/ body, self/ other, subject/ object, artist/ artwork, discovery/ invention,’ offers the black body a method by which the alienness of terrestrial belonging can be re-scripted, re-coded and re-organised into alternative modes of being and becoming. Here we reference Denise da Silva’s adoption of mathematical reasoning to devise procedures that unleash ‘blackness’ to confront life or Stefano Harney and Fred Moten’s proposed methodology of the undercommon which prompts black people to adopt a right of indifference to representation in the break of artistic production.

One goal is to understand how the black body operates at the intersections of history, speculation and technique. Another is to move beyond a methodological immediacy that reflects historical and present modes of sufferings and displacements. The overall aim, however, is to imagine new relational frameworks that seek to understand how the imposition of circumstance can emerge as a politics of self-determinate belonging.

It is here, at the junction of encounter and context, that Félix Guattari views the racialised group as assigning meaning. This meaning is a force that ‘constitutes the seeds of the production of subjectivity’, as ‘we are not in the presence of a passively representative image, but a vector of subjectivation’ (Guattari, et. al., 1995: 29−30). It is through the meaning of backness that the black, brown and racialised individual creates a cohesion of (mis)representation, expounded by aesthetic markers, dynamic vibrations and cultural kineticisms often expressed as a sense of belonging.

Techno Resistance and Black Futures takes this point of departure as method of intervention and critique (in literature, philosophy, sonic resonances, short film, science fiction, social platforms, gaming, cosplay, graphic arts and other digital and geek ecologies) that put forward the potential for alternative modes of living for the racialised body. In other words, it asks how the black, brown and ‘othered’ body can move beyond the study of symbolic, transcendental or physiological human attributes, or critique that exposes the violences of power (in their colonial, imperial and capitalist articulations) toward conditions of relation that activate new modes of being and becoming, and ultimately the liberation of black potential?”

Organised by: Ramon Amaro, Digital Culture Unit, Centre for Cultural Studies

Catastrophe: Critical Legal Conference 2017 @ Warwick – Call for Streams

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Image: “Catastrophe” by Lala Gallardo

Thought this conference might be of interest to readers, and it’s happening here at Warwick:

“Ten years ago, the so-called ‘Invisible Committee’ urged that ‘It is useless to wait…. To go on waiting is madness. The catastrophe is not coming, it is here. We are already situated within the collapse of a civilization. It is within this reality that we must choose sides.’ Over a decade before, Leonard Cohen had written; ‘This is the darkness, this is the flood. The catastrophe has already happpened and the question we now face is what is the appropriate behaviour.’ The 2017 Critical Legal Conference thus calls for streams, panels and papers that reflect upon ‘catastrophe’; on the catastrophes of our time and upon their interrelations; upon the questions of appropriate behaviours that might emerge and sides that might be taken. In particular we hope to encourage streams on:

  • Increasing brutality and violence of the carceral and security state;
  • War, migration, and refugee crises;
  • Racism, xenophobia, misogyny, transphobia, homophobia and countless forms of day to day violence;
  • On the atmospheres of violence under regimes of Modi, Temer, Trump, Brexit or Erdogan
  • Natural disasters and the effects of climate change in the anthropocene;
  • Forms of colonialism, neocolonialism and economic imperialism driven by capitalism and neoliberal ideologies;
  • Crises of care and depletion of the social reproductive capacities under global capitalism;
  • Rampant fear-mongering and the political exploitation of deprivation.
  • Catastrophe, disaster and crisis as modes of biopolitics, governance or accumulation

However, these catastrophes are only the most obvious effecting us today. Catastrophe does not necessarily imply a sudden fright or a grand world-historical moment that is evident to all. We also want to emphasise: the slow violence of catastrophe; the gradual and often imperceptible disintegration that is neither spectacular nor instantaneous; the ‘human catastrophes’ fostered by capitalism in its crises of social reproduction; intimate catastrophes, moments of collapse and calamity that concern the subject and the psyche, as well as the domestic.

Taking a cue from Bonnie Honig, we might identify the genre of this mode of critique as containing something of the dark romantics. The catastrophe is that chasmatic void into which we are about to fall (or perhaps we have already fallen). We are pervaded by a sense of the coming (or already arrived) doom. But despite this, catastrophe also suggests an opening to something beyond. It creates new spaces for resistance and solidarity, while potentially strengthening old ones. Catastrophe names the end in ancient Greek music and theatre, an unravelling and return to context. It was coupled with anakrousis – a sonorous explosion that was played at the beginning of a performance to clear the ears and so make space for a cosmos to be created. Catastrophe announced the overturning of that world and prepared the listeners to leave the theatre, to return to the street and to the context of popular life. Tolkien coins the term Eucatastrophe to signify the sudden positive resolution of a seemingly impossible situation. Thus, continuing from the hugely successful 2016 CLC focus on ‘turning points’, the theme of catastrophe asks us to consider the day after the moment of rupture, the period after the turning point.

What are the traps of thinking through ‘catastrophe’? Does catastrophe require redemption? Certainly modes of Christian theology imagine the katechon – the worldly suspension of the end times in which we are situated – as the holding-off of the justice of the end of the world. But by thinking our situation in other cosmologies, does the question of the catastrophe disappear, or appear differently? Or in a more profane sense, what are the problems of thinking through the lens of the catastrophe – is there a catastrophe (for us) in thinking catastrophe? Should we move away from the thought of the catastrophe and think more hopefully or joyfully?

Finally, we hope the question of catastrophe also invites a certain critical self-reflection. In liberal accounts, law seems to stand out against the catastrophe: the catastrophe is the perversion of legal rationality or the inability of pure legal norms to reach their proper context. Critical fields seek to undermine this claim, but to what extent and what effect? And what of the left’s own catastrophes, what of the co-option of resistance in human rights or development, or of the various collapses or exhaustions of left political and legal projects?

So we invite participants to the coming Catastrophe of the 2017 Critical Legal Conference at the Warwick Law School and in conjunction with the Social Theory Centre. It will take place on the 1st-3rd of September. Further details can be found on the conference webpage (Link). Please send your stream proposals to clcwarwick@gmail.com. The closing date for streams will be the 28th of February, the call for papers will open after that.”

http://criticallegalthinking.com/2017/01/19/catastrophe-critical-legal-conference-2017-call-streams/

‘Blow up my town’ @ Market Gallery, Glasgow

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Image: Bhanu Kapil, Performance for Ban at Pratt Institute, New York, April, 2013

An interesting discussion is taking place in Glasgow on Sunday 22 January 2017. Entitled “Blow up my town: Perspectives on self-abolition, the body, and transgression”, it is a one-off “reading/group/discussion” that takes inspiration from artists and writers such as Chantal Akerman, Bhanu Kapil, Jack Halberstam, Nathaniel Mackey, Pipilotti Rist and Marina Vishmidt. They seem to be fully booked, but the website already has some interesting materials that may be interesting to readers. I’ve been told that the website will continue as a resource – and hopefully as a platform for future events!

RGS-IBG 2017 RACE Working Group Call for Sessions

The Race, Culture and Equality (RACE) Working Group would like to invite proposals for sessions to be sponsored by RACE at the RGS-IBG annual conference 2017 titled ‘Decolonizing geographical knowledges: opening up geography to the world’. A key objective of the RACE Working Group of the RGS-IBG is to promote scholarship on topics of racial inequality, colonization, decolonization and whiteness, and to encourage dialogue on race that advances academic knowledge and progressive practices. The RACE Working Group therefore welcomes proposals on these topics more generally, but we strongly encourage proposals that critically and creatively engage with these topics in relation to the conference theme specifically, for example; by exploring the limitations, contradictions and injustices of organising a conference on the topic of decolonization in western neoliberal academic settings; and/or by examining the contemporary co-option of decolonial thinking in a range of settings. We are also interested in sponsoring sessions and activities by activists and scholar-activists, as well as artists and scholar-artists, that propose and explore practical initiatives for dismantling colonial processes within the discipline, within the university system, and within the RGS-IBG.

Please email proposals to raceworkinggroup@gmail.com by 22 January 2017. Submissions should include a title, an abstract (max 250 words), the format of the session or activity, the number of timeslots requested (if applicable), and name(s) and affiliation(s) of the organizers. The guidelines for organising sessions can be found here http://tinyurl.com/pdrjfek. We will endeavor to respond to organizers by the end of January 2017.

  1. For more on decolonization, please see Tuck, E. and Yang, K. W. (2012) Decolonization is not a metaphor, Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, 1(1), p. 1-40.

Race and the Academy events at Warwick

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Image source: Warwick Anti-Racism Society

Two events coming up at Warwick (where I currently work) that may be of interest to readers. They are organised by the Warwick Anti-Racism Society.

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Antinormalisation: Academic Action in the Political Present

The Role of the Academic in the Current Political Context: Working Against Normalisation

University of Warwick OC1.01 The Oculus
5-7pm

Recent political events have taken a dangerous turn: white supremacist actors are taking up prominent positions within formal politics, while far-right groups in society are becoming increasingly emboldened, vocal, and violent.

Within academia itself, however, established technologies of exclusion — including Prevent, migration monitoring, and the exploitation of racialised labour — have already been normalised by our institutions. How might these existing structures articulate in oppressive ways with a broader renewed politics of exclusion?

In this critical context, this event draws together members of the Warwick community in order to discuss, and commit to, ways of counteracting the normalisation of white supremacist and fascist politics. We will use the session to work towards a collective statement of purpose setting out a series of common commitments to building solidarity with students and protecting our intellectual environment in the present context.

Gurminder K. Bhambra, Shirin Rai, Pablo Mukherjee, Goldie Osuri, Lara Choksey, Adam Elliott-Cooper, Kathryn Medien, Nicola Pratt, and other members of the Warwick community will make interventions in order to build the conversation.

There will be a planning meeting open to students and staff immediately following this event, from 7-8pm, in the same room (OC1.01). We’ll discuss the following:

1. A BME staff-student network
2. A Race Equality pressure group with staff from across the university
3. Responding to racist incidents on campus.

Abstract

Political shifts around the world are becoming increasingly indicative of the onset of a global fascist era. In the US, the election of Donald Trump has come to pass after a campaign period in which he referenced his own sexual violence, labelled Mexicans as ‘rapists’, and pledged to collate a register of, deny entry to, and deport Muslims on the basis of their faith. Prominent white supremacists have already been appointed to the White House, while far-right groups, fortified by their access to mainstream politics, have become more prominent and outspoken.
Meanwhile, the UK has witnessed the recent political murder of MP and anti-racist campaigner Jo Cox by a white supremacist connected to far-right networks, while the post-Brexit context has been marked by widespread racist and xenophobic violence and abuse brought to bear against persons racialised as ‘non-native’.
Further, regimes in Turkey, India, and the Philippines are intensifying racial, ethnic or religious forms of exclusion and increasingly using violence and other means of oppression against their own people.
In parallel to, and in support of, fascist politics at the formal level, neo-nazi (so-called ‘alt-right’) supremacist movements are gathering strength globally and becoming more active online, on our campuses, and in other social spaces.

As members of the Warwick community, we do not take these grave social and political changes lightly and we are particularly concerned about the impact of fascistic actions and discourses on our own students. This event is therefore intended to provide a platform for us to confront our own responsibilities, both as citizens and academics, in this political moment. It will also be an opportunity to consider the technologies of exclusion which have already been normalised in our institutions — from the Prevent strategy to the monitoring of migrants — and to consider how these might be further countered.

During this session we will address the following questions:

What is the role of the academic, and the university more broadly, in an age of resurgent white supremacy?
In what ways can we show support and solidarity to our students of colour, migrants, and other targeted minorities as racist discourses and actions become ever more prominent in the public domain?
How can we collectively stand together to reject the fascist, racist, Islamophobic, anti-Semitic, misogynistic, homophobic and transphobic politics and sentiment which is gathering pace?
What can we do to resist the normalisation of the politics of exclusion?
How can we reconsider concepts such as no-platforming, non-cooperation, anti-normalisation, academic freedom, and freedom of speech in the urgent context of the rise of deadly political ideologies?
How can we construct spaces of sanctuary within our own flawed institution for students who feel as though they are in danger?
How can we counter those technologies of exclusion which have already been normalised?

This event is organised by Lisa Tilley (PAIS)

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Racism on Campus: The BME Attainment Gap in Higher Education

The Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) Attainment Gap in UK Higher Education: A Student-Staff Roundtable

Wednesday 18th January
OC1.06 (Oculus Building)
4-6pm

This event invites students and staff to participate in a roundtable on the Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) attainment gap in UK Higher Education. National data suggests that BME students routinely get lower grades than their white peers even when they enter on the same grades. Why does this occur? What are the barriers that BME students face in attaining higher grades? What practices at universities could support a fair, equitable system? Is blind-marking an effective insurance against institutional bias? What are the processes available to students who experience institutional discrimination?

This event will provide a forum for students and staff to learn about the BME attainment gap and to discuss ways of addressing it.

With Robbie Shilliam (QMUL) and Paul Warmington (Warwick), chaired by Gurminder Bhambra (Warwick).

This is the second event in the ‘Racism on Campus’ roundtable series, and is co-hosted by Warwick Anti-Racism Society. All welcome.