Events: Internationalisation in HE (Loughborough) / Postcolonial Politics (London)

Two excellent events are happening on Thursday 26 April 2018. I may be speaking at the event on internationalisation.

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The Internationalisation of Higher Education: Policies, Pedagogies and Practices

Thursday 26 April 2018
9am – 5pm
Department of Geography
Loughborough University
Holywell Park
Loughborough
LE11 3TL

Higher Education institutions in the UK, and in many countries across the world, are increasingly seeking to incorporate an international dimension to their research, teaching and public engagement. The rationale behind, and the implications of, these endeavours have become the subject of much debate among academics, policymakers and the wider public.

This one-day symposium will contribute to these debates by exploring the following question – How can academics and practitioners work both within and against the grain of neoliberal internationalising agendas within higher education, in a way that is simultaneously critical and constructive? This overarching question will be examined over the course of the day via three key interrelated themes: 1) Institutional Policies and Practices 2) Mobilities 3) Pedagogies and Curricula.

Confirmed speakers include:

James Booth, PhD Candidate, University of Leicester
James Esson, Lecturer in Human Geography, Loughborough University
Peter Kraftl, Professor of Human Geography and College Director of Internationalisation, University of Birmingham
Ed Nash, International Strategy Officer, University of Oxford
Clare Newstead, College International Manager, Nottingham Trent University
Patricia Noxolo, Senior Lecturer in Human Geography, University of Birmingham
Laura Prazeres, Lecturer in Geography, University of St Andrews
Parvati Raghuram, Professor of human geography, Open University
Nathalie Tebbett, PhD candidate, Loughborough University
Johanna Waters, Associate professor in human geography, University of Oxford

Speakers and participants will engage with the key question and themes via the following indicative topics:

– Belonging and identity
– Government policies and migration management
– Global rankings and league tables
– Intercultural learning and deficit models
– Internationalisation of learning and teaching
– Mental health and wellbeing
– Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) related research activities
– Qualification ‘mismatches’
– Racism and Xenophobia
– The (mis)alignment between internationalisation agendas, widening participation, and equality and diversity agendas
– The mobilities of global academic talent
– Transnational socialisation

Free tickets available here.

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If you are in London, there is an excellent booklaunch and discussion the same evening:

Where to now? Postcolonial Politics in the 21st Century

A roundtable to mark the launch of the Routledge Handbook of Postcolonial Politics edited by Olivia U. Rutazibwa and Robbie Shilliam. Free tickets (and description) available here.

Thu 26 April 2018
6-8pm
Department of International Relations
Queen Mary University of London
Mile End Road
Arts 1 Lecture Theatre
London
E1 4NS

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Researching the Colonial International Across, Between, and Against Disciplines @ Warwick

Am reposting this excellent workshop call from CPD-BISA. The event is organised by Nivi Manchanda, Lisa Tilley (Warwick Politics and International Studies) and Kerem Nişancıoğlu (SOAS Politics and International Studies) and is taking place here at Warwick.

Call for interventions/workshop participants
Travel funding available

Colonial/ Postcolonial/ Decolonial Working Group Annual Workshop 2017: 
Researching the Colonial International Across, Between, and Against Disciplines

With Goldie Osuri, Virinder Kalra, Rashmi Varma and Kojo Koram
University of Warwick, 22nd September 2017

“International Relations has often borrowed theories and methods from elsewhere to think beyond its own disciplinary limits. Similarly, interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary scholarship has long been central to thinking about the colonial question. Indeed, a key insight of postcolonial scholarship is that disciplines are themselves products of colonial practices. At the same time, in the field of International Relations and beyond, the demands of publishing, researching, teaching and hiring continue to reproduce strict disciplinary boundaries. More positively, disciplines often offer a scholarly home, a shared language and common problems that help orient our work.

This workshop will examine how such tensions affect and direct how we think about the colonial/ postcolonial/ decolonial. Conversely it will also ask how the colonial question reconfigures how we think about our own disciplines. At its core, the event will encourage a range of scholars to engage with the colonial question from outside of – and perhaps against – their own disciplinary (disciplining) homes.

Places and travel funding are limited. Please indicate your interest in attending no later than June 24th to Kerem Nisancioglu – kn18@soas.ac.uk

CPD-BISA workshops are not organized around “paper-giving”, but rather each session is introduced by a couple of five minute opening interventions. Therefore, if you are interested in attending please do also indicate whether you would like to provide one of these five-minute interventions, and if so, on what issue area.

We will calculate participation and funding with a sensitivity to career level (phd, postdoc, faculty etc) and job type (contract, permanent etc). Please do indicate your career and job attributes when you email.

Over the past four years, the CPD-BISA Working Group has become an established community of scholars drawn from within and beyond IR – this interdisciplinarity has enriched the work and activities of the community as a whole. Our annual workshop is our most important event and provides a vital space for early career scholars to connect with more established academics working through the colonial question in their research. As in previous years, this will be an innovative and participatory event with a range of heterodox sessions.”